Podcasts

Podcasts

  • Filmmaker & Cave Diver Jill Heinerth

    In episode twenty five, host Brett Stanley is talking to underwater filmmaker and cave diver Jill Heinerth.

    Jill is an amazing woman who’s explorations have taken her to places no person has ever seen before, including the caves inside icebergs. We talk about her career underwater, how she controls her own fears, and what it’s like filming documentaries and consulting on feature films.

    In To The Planet is Jills firsthand account of exploring the earth’s final frontier: the hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet.

    Follow: Website, Instagram, Facebook

  • Fine Art Photographer Mallory Morrison

    In episode twenty four, host Brett Stanley chats with Fine Art Photographer Mallory Morrison. Mallory has perfected her ethereal and minimal style underwater, and also her print sales process.

    She shares with us how she got started working with dancers underwater, how she channels her fears and nightmares in to her work as a kind of therapy, and her approach to creating art that sells.

    Follow: Website, Instagram, Facebook

  • Master Freedive Instructor Roberta Cenedese

    In episode twenty three, host Brett Stanley chats with Master Freedive Instructor & cold water specialist Roberta Cenedese. Based in Vancouver Canada, Roberta often works on film and tv sets coaching actors for their underwater scenes, she works alongside stunt performers as part of the safety team, and provides guidance to the production on how to achieve some of the technical shots their going for.

    They chat about breath holding techniques, how dangerous cold water can be, and how amazing it was working on a show like Siren.

    Follow Roberta: Website

  • Underwater Virtual Reality Pioneer Casey Sapp

    In episode twenty two, host Brett Stanley chats with Casey Sapp – a pioneer in underwater Virtual Reality. Casey’s company VRTUL designs and builds some of the most amazing camera arrays for capturing 180 and 360 degree underwater experiences.

    We chat about how he got started in this industry, and some of the very cool clients he’s had. There is a bit of technical jargon in this episode, but you should be able to follow along fine without knowing all the terms.  

    Follow Casey/VRTUL: Website, Facebook, LinkdIn

  • Conceptual Photographer Lucie Drlikova

    In episode twenty one, host Brett Stanley chats with underwater photographer Lucie Drlikova in the beautiful city of Prague, in the Czech Republic.

    Lucie’s work is a beautiful mix of fantasy, wonder, and perfectly executed concepts. She makes a lot of the set pieces, props, and outfits herself – and combined with her crisp clean post production her underwater images really come to life.

    They chat about her travels, finding her love for underwater photography, the celebrity and charity projects she’s been involved in, and a very cool technique for helping her clients relax in the water.

    Follow Lucie: Website, Instagram, Facebook

  • Choreographer Mary Jeanette Ramsey

    In episode twenty, host Brett Stanley chats with Mary Jeanette Ramsey – choreographer, performer, and Executive Director of The Aqualillies, an American synchronised swimming troupe or Artistic Swimming as it’s now called.

    They chat about working on the Cohen Brothers film Hail Caesar with Scarlett Johansson, helping Beyonce to craft an all black synchronised swimming troupe for her visual album Black is King, and how the sport has evolved from the 50’s when Legend Esther Williams made it famous.

    Follow Mary: Website

  • Underwater Camera Operator Braden Haggerty

    In episode nineteen, host Brett Stanley chats with underwater camera operator Braden Haggerty, a Canadian who’s based in Vancouver. Braden has worked on shows like Batwoman, Altered Carbon, Power Rangers, and the recently cancelled Siren – a drama about mermaids with loads of underwater sequences.

    They chat about the process of shooting for TV, what she needs to keep in mind for the visual effects, and how training your stunt people for underwater can make the job go so much smoother!

    Follow Braden: Website, Instagram, IMDB

  • Surf & Fine Art Photographer Lucas Murnaghan

    In episode eighteen, host Brett Stanley is joined by Surf and Fine Art Photographer Lucas Murnaghan. Lucas is based in Toronto and as you’ll hear in the interview he runs a surf shop on the edge of Lake Ontario where there’s a decent surfing community!

    Lucas talks about shooting surf photos in Lake Ontario and further afield, and how he started to include male portraiture into his work. We chat about the business of Fine art photography, directing male models, and how being gay might change the lens through which your work is viewed.

  • Artivist & Performer Christine Ren

    In episode seventeen, host Brett Stanley is joined by underwater Artivist and performer Christine Ren. Christine has a degree in Marine Affairs and Policy which give her a great insight in to how our water ways are being managed and also a strong desire to make some change in the world with her own conservation campaigns.

    Christine chats about creating some of the campaigns she’s created, what worked and what didn’t, and how she’s now using water as a way to overcome trauma with her healing Watsu practice.

    They also discuss techniques for a better breath hold, and how a lot of her inspiration comes from within.

  • Director of Photography Ian Seabrook

    In episode sixteen, host Brett Stanley is chatting with Ian Seabrook, a Canadian underwater Camera Operator and Director of Photography who spends most of his time working between Canada, America, and the UK. His work includes underwater scenes in features like Deadpool 2, Batman vs Superman, Lost in Space, and Pirates of the Caribbean.

    They talk about learning underwater photography from National Geographic legend David Doubilet, the importance of an open and sharing film community, how a great assistant can make life easier, and nearly being crushed by logs and rolling icebergs in the arctic.

    Keep an ear out for Ian’s crack at an Aussie accent – it’s pretty good!